October 2005 archive

Oct 29 2005

Linux Kernel 2.6.14 Released

Tux the Linux Penguin Mascot

After some delays forced by last minute bug reports, kernel 2.6.14 has been released. Linus Torvalds said in September when he first froze the code for 2.6.14 that there were changes “all over the place,” and that is definitely the case. LinuxDevices.com has a good summary, and the announcement from Linus himself is available at …

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Oct 28 2005

Extra Brain Cells Jump Start Weight Loss

Big Mac

According to Nature.com, researchers have discovered that an injection of a drug used to promote the growth of new brain cells also has the effect of causing weight loss, as much as 15%, in laboratory mice. Scientists are hoping that they can harness this side-effect, which lasts for at least several weeks, to fight obesity …

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Oct 28 2005

Nanotech Pioneer Richard Smalley Dies

Richard Smalley

Nobel prize winner Richard Smalley, co-discoverer of fullerene and one of the most prominent and well-respected nanotechnology researchers in the world, passed away today after a six year battle with cancer. He was 62 years old. Dr. Smalley shared the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of buckminsterfullerene with Robert Curl, another Rice …

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Oct 28 2005

UC Riverside’s Nano-Walker

UC Riverside 9,10-dithioanthracene Walker

Only last week we learned about a nanoscale car developed by researchers at Rice University. Today BoingBoing points us to this news release from the University of California at Riverside about a molecule that scientists there have developed that can move in a straight line in a manner that mimics human walking. The research team, …

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Oct 27 2005

Korea’s Intelligent Service Robot Project

Roboking, LG Electronics' cleaning robot

Gizmodo’s got a brief summary today of an article in the Korea Herald that outlines the government of South Korea’s desire to have commercially available intelligent robots by next year. The “intelligent service robot” project as it is being called by the Ministry of Information and Communication states that intelligent robots for entertainment, education, home …

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Oct 26 2005

Clay Nanotubes

Halloysite

CNET News.com published an article today about NaturalNano, a New York nanotech company that has taken the unique approach of using clay as a carrier in it’s nanotube applications. Halloysite is a naturally occurring clay mineral made up of primarily aluminum, silicon, oxygen, and hydrogen. Historically used for making porcelain, bone and fine china, researchers …

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Oct 25 2005

Remote-Controlled Humans

Remote Controlled Human

AP Reporter Yuri Kageyama has written a summary published at LiveScience.com of the day she was “remote-controlled” while visiting a research center in Japan. Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp., a Japanese telephone company, has created a headset that delivers a low voltage electric current that can be controlled remotely and affects the balance and movement …

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Oct 24 2005

Mac Mini Robot

Mac Mini Robot

Engadget.com has a brief post today about this Mac mini robot.┬áThe developer’s site, kulturtechnik.twoday.net, is in German, but the translated page does yield some details about the project including the fact that the robot’s vision is provided by, fittingly enough, an iSight mounted on the mini’s case and that it’s AI is based on the …

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Oct 23 2005

FDA Approves Brain Stem Cell Transplant

Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

On Thursday of last week the FDA approved the first transplant of fetal stem cells into human brains. The first recipients will be children who suffer from a rare and fatal genetic disorder, but if the procedure is successful it could be the first step in making great strides toward treating, curing, and possibly preventing …

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Oct 22 2005

The World’s Smallest Car

Nanocar

LiveScience.com is reporting that scientists at Rice University have invented the world’s smallest car. At a mere 4 nanometers wide, the car is able to roll on its buckyball wheels. While other teams have been able to make vehicle-shaped nano machines, this car is the first to actually roll versus sliding along the surface as …

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